Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 

Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 

This recipe for Chicken and Dumplings from The Pioneer Woman is a meal-in-one that does not include any condensed soup and will be loved by the whole family. Because of my special ingredient, the dumplings are light and airy, with a biscuit-like texture, and while they are deliciously soft and not sticky, they manage to keep their shape and don’t fall apart when they are cooked.

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Why You’ll Love This Chicken And Dumplings Recipe:

  • Delicious & creamy: This simple Pioneer Woman recipe for chicken and dumplings creates a warm and savory symphony of soft chicken, tender vegetables, and layers of rich aromatic taste, all of which are encased in a blanket of creamy broth and topped with light and airy dumplings that are studded with fresh herbs. In addition, the soup is seasoned to perfection using carefully selected Italian ingredients, and then it is ramified with both a roux and cornstarch, which results in the soup having an incredible amount of flavor and a velvety texture.
  • Flavorful & tender dumplings: Not only does the velvety stew have an intoxicatingly delicious flavor, but the dumplings also include two unusual components that take them to a whole new level (see the section on the dumplings to find out the secrets!). In addition to being flavored with butter and herbs, the dumplings absorb the flavor of the delicious broth as they cook — be ready to drool. The best part is that after cooking they turn out fluffy, supple, plump, and soft rather than sticky.
  • Easy homemade drop dumplings: The dumplings are produced from scratch with a minimum amount of effort, which is a winning combination. Simply combine the buttermilk, melted butter, and egg in a separate bowl, whisk to form solidified butter clumps, then stir the buttermilk mixture into the dry ingredients. This method produces soft biscuits without the need to chop the butter into the mixture. To finish, add the mixture into the pot of boiling soup with a spoonful. That’s all! No rolling or cutting like rolling dumplings.
  • Ingredients that are easily stored in the pantry: You probably already have most of the components for this homemade chicken and dumplings dish on hand because it does not require a lot of complicated or expensive ingredients. This dish may be made with any type of chicken you have on hand, from chicken thighs to chicken breasts to rotisserie chicken, and it will still turn out delicious.
  • No cream soup: This Pioneer woman chicken and dumplings recipe does not call for the use of any canned soups labeled as “cream of,” yet the result is still luscious, creamy, and full of flavor.
  • Shortcuts that are both simple and efficient: This homemade Pioneer Woman chicken and dumplings recipe makes use of a few simple shortcuts, which allows it to be prepared quickly enough to be done on a weeknight without sacrificing any of the dish’s delicious flavor. To begin making chicken and dumplings from home, first, bring a whole chicken to a boil. This dish uses chicken thighs, which are both tasty and quick to cook, to cut down on the amount of time needed for preparation and cooking. Additionally, instead of making their chicken broth with chicken bouillon and other ingredients, they utilize chicken broth that can be purchased at the supermarket. This helps to produce a more nuanced flavor profile.
  • Meal-in-one: This simple Pioneer Woman recipe for chicken and dumplings is a complete supper in itself since it combines protein, vegetables, and bread-like dumplings into a single dish that is cooked in just one pot. Serve on its own or with fuss-free sides such as a straightforward green salad and fruit.

What Are Chicken And Dumplings?

One of my go-to choices for a hearty but reassuring supper is chicken and dumplings. It is a well-liked soup in the Midwest and the South of the United States, and it consists of shredded chicken, onions, and celery swimming in either a rich stew broth or a creamy broth, and it is covered with a blanket of dumplings that are made in the shape of biscuits. The dumplings are prepared using a straightforward dough that is produced by combining ingredients such as milk, buttermilk, and flour before dropping the dough by the spoonful into a pot of simmering soup to allow it to steam and cook the dumplings. It is possible to shape the dumplings into balls or roll them out into a flat sheet and then cut them into strips to make “noodles.”Taste is the most important factor to consider when determining the consistency of homemade chicken and dumplings. The consistency can range from being thin and brothy to being rich and stew-like to being rich and creamy to having the consistency of a very thick casserole, which is best eaten with a fork rather than a spoon. But regardless of how you enjoy it, Chicken and Dumplings will undoubtedly make you feel toasty and warm all the way through.

Where Did Chicken And Dumplings Come From?

The dish is known as “Chicken and Dumplings” is thought to have been developed in the late 1600s in the southern United States, although there are many variations of this dish in Europe and other parts of the world. However, the Chicken and Dumplings dish as we know it today is thought to have originated in the United States. Dishes could be stretched further with the addition of chicken and dumplings, which was a cost-effective method, and empty stomachs could be filled with pantry ingredients. The recipe was first published in 1879, which contributed to the dish’s increased level of notoriety. Since that time, chicken and dumplings have established themselves as a cornerstone of American cuisine and a cherished tradition across the South.

What’s The Difference Between Chicken And Pastry And Chicken And Dumplings?

Noodles made from biscuit dough are formed into wide, flat sheets and used in a dish that goes by the name “chicken and pastry” or simply “chicken pastry.” It is often regarded to be a separate meal from “chicken and dumplings,” which is recognized for having little balls of dough rather than flat strips of dough. This is the case in situations where such a difference is established.

Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 
Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 

What Ingredients To Make Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings?

  • Flour: For the flour, I use all-purpose flour, but I think gluten-free 1-to-1 baking flour would also be an acceptable substitute. If you use cake flour or self-rising flour, you will need to adjust the other ingredients, such as the amount of baking powder and baking soda.
  • Cornmeal: Cornmeal is my secret ingredient that packs a powerful punch. Not only does it impart a delicious, nutty maize flavor and an exceptional texture, but it also keeps the dumplings from turning into a sticky mass. Use cornmeal that has been finely ground rather than cornmeal that has been coarsely ground, and check to be sure that the recipe calls for cornmeal and not corn flour.
  • Buttermilk: Because the lactic acid in buttermilk combines with the baking soda to leaven the products and produce a soft crumb, using buttermilk in recipes for cornbread, cakes, muffins, and bread makes them especially tender.
  • Butter: adds butter deliciousness. Make sure to use unsalted butter so that we have more control over the salt content of the dish.
  • Baking powder and baking soda: sometimes known simply as baking powder and baking soda, respectively, are acidic and a basic leavening agent. They collaborate to produce dumplings that are airy and supple. To ensure that your baking powder and baking soda are effective, check their expiration dates and replace them after six to twelve months.
  • Sugar: Sugar helps produce soft and supple dumplings by soaking up part of the liquid and retarding the production of gluten strands. This results in less gluten being produced overall. In addition, it encourages the caramelization process, resulting in more golden dumplings.
  • Egg:  Eggs are not often used in the preparation of dumplings or biscuits; yet, the addition of even just one egg results in a remarkable improvement in the quality of these baked goods. Food 52 conducted a test in which they compared biscuits made with an egg to biscuits made without an egg. The results showed that biscuits made with an egg had a more robust flavor, were doughier and moister, were noticeably taller, were more tender (due to the fat in the yolk), and were more golden (due to the additional protein which contributes to the Maillard reaction).
  • Seasonings: The flavor of the dumplings is enhanced with seasonings such as dried parsley, dried chives, salt, and pepper.

How To Make Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings?

  • In a measuring glass or a small dish, whisk together the buttermilk and the egg. Then, place the mixture in the refrigerator until it is time to make the dumplings.
  • In a large Dutch oven or soup pot, bring 2 tablespoons of oil up to temperature over medium-high heat. The chicken should be seasoned with half a teaspoon of salt and half a teaspoon of pepper before being seared for about two minutes on each side. Transfer to a platter, but do not discard the drippings.
  • Over medium heat, melt three tablespoons of butter together with two tablespoons of olive oil. After adding the onions, carrots, and celery, continue to sauté the mixture for another four minutes while scraping off the gold pieces that have accumulated on the bottom of the pan. 
  • It will get thick; make sure the flour doesn’t cling to the bottom of the pot or it will burn later on. Add the garlic and sauté it for thirty seconds. Sprinkle in the flour and continue cooking while stirring regularly for two minutes. You can add extra oil if needed.
  • Mix in the chicken broth, chicken bouillon, all of the spices, a quarter of a teaspoon of salt, and the bay leaf, then add the chicken broth. 
  • Put the chicken back into the cooking pot. After the soup has reached a simmer, replace the lid on the pot and move it to the side so that it just partially covers the pot, leaving an opening of approximately an inch. Simmer the soup for 12 to 15 minutes, stirring it regularly and replacing the lid. When the chicken is cooked through and soft enough to shred, the soup is done. Prepare the dough for the dumplings in the meantime.
  • Dumplings: Mix all of the dry ingredients in a large bowl using a whisk. Stir melted butter into the buttermilk/egg mixture until tiny clumps form.
  • Don’t overmix the batter mixture; instead, gently fold the curdled buttermilk mixture into the flour mixture using a rubber spatula just until incorporated and the batter mixture begins to slightly pull away from the edges of the bowl. Set the batter mixture aside.
  • When the chicken is ready, transfer it to a chopping board, and then shred it before returning it to the saucepan. Cornstarch and half-and-half should be mixed until smooth before being added back into the kettle. To prepare the soup, bring it to a low simmer.
  • Dollop pieces of dough into the boiling soup using a greased tablespoon or a cookie scoop numbered 50, making sure to leave some room between each piece. 
  • Cover, and then lower the heat to a low setting. Cook for fifteen to twenty minutes, or until the dumplings have reached the desired doneness. You may test a dumpling by slicing it in half and looking inside. 
  • Before serving, give the soup ten minutes to rest; this will give the dumplings time to soak up some of the liquid from the soup. Add more salt and pepper to each bowl, according to personal preference.
Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 
Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 

Recipe Tips 

Tips For Dumplings:

  • Diy buttermilk/sour milk: To make your buttermilk or sour milk, take a measuring glass and add one tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice to it. Add enough whole milk (not nonfat) to make up the remainder of the 3/4 cup. To activate it, stir it and then let it sit for 5–10 minutes.
  • Cornmeal can be used: Cornmeal not only imparts a deliciously nutty maize taste to the dumplings but also improves the texture of the dumplings and keeps them from becoming sticky.
  • It’s great to have clumps: The secret to making delicate biscuits is in combining the buttermilk, egg, and melted butter. Small clumps of solidified butter occur as the heated, melted butter is mixed with the cold buttermilk and egg, giving the appearance that the butter has been curdled. Without having to chop the butter into the flour first, the curdled butter particles are what aerate the dough and produce the perfect texture for the finished product.
  • Be careful not to overmix: After the wet components have been added to the dry ones, the dough has to be stirred very slowly and carefully until it comes together. You want your dough to be on the loose side and to have a good amount of air in it. When the dough is overmixed, the gluten in the wheat forms elastic strands of gluten, which leads to a texture that is thick, chewy, and rough. As soon as you can see that the dough is coming together and pulling away from the bowl, you should stop mixing it.
  • Avoid putting dumplings in the bag: To shape the dough into dumplings, you may either use a cookie dough scoop or a spoon. Avoid shaping the dough with your hands after it has been scooped, as this will cause the dough to get compacted and result in dumplings that are rough and chewy.
  • Take cover, and try not to peek: After you have added the dumplings, be sure to cover the pot so that the dumplings may cook evenly while being steamed, resulting in dumplings that are perfectly light and delicate. Fight the temptation to lift the lid until it is time to check whether the food is done. If you open the cover, all of the lovely steam will leave, and the dumplings will begin to boil rather than steam when the kettle begins to generate steam once more. If you do not have a lid for your pot, cover it with aluminum foil in the most secure manner possible.
  • Have fun: Dumplings and chicken and dumplings are a marriage made in culinary heaven, but dumplings are so versatile that they may be added to any kind of soup. You may add dumplings to MinestroneCorn Chowder, your leftover Thanksgiving turkey soup, and other types of soup. These exquisite dumplings are a safe bet; you just can’t go wrong with them.

Tips For Soup:

  • Use chicken thighs in your Pioneer Woman recipe: This straightforward recipe for Chicken and Dumplings may be made with either chicken breasts or chicken thighs; however, using chicken thighs or shredded rotisserie chicken yields the greatest flavor and the juiciest chicken.
  • Rotisserie chicken: When you would normally add the shredded chicken thighs to the soup, instead add around three cups’ worth of shredded chicken. To ensure that I always have chicken on hand to add to any soup recipe, I like to keep shredded chicken or chicken from a rotisserie chicken portioned into freezer bags holding three cups each.
  • Customize veggies: You may use whatever vegetables you have on hand, in addition to the mirepoix, or you can mix them up for some added fun! Everything from green beans and maize to potatoes and zucchini would taste wonderful. Be aware, however, that the majority of the veggies will not require the complete cooking time; for more specific directions, please refer to the Variations section.
  • Vegetable size: Because they are going to simmer for a longer period than most soups, the carrots and celery should have a thickness of at least half an inch. If you want to keep your vegetables from turning into mush, avoid cutting them too finely.
  • A replacement for half and a half: If you don’t have any half-and-half on hand, you may substitute milk and heavy cream in equal parts, or you can use evaporated milk instead.
  • Flour should not be burned: If you allow the flour to become stuck to the bottom of the saucepan, it will burn when you try to use it later. If the flour is difficult to work with, you may always add more oil.
  • Consistency: You have the option of making this Chicken and Dumplings dish thicker and more like gravy, or you can make it more like a broth. Check out the area where I explain how to change the consistency.
  • At the latter end of the cooking time, do not stir: Do not stir the mixture once the pot is completely covered with magnificent, fluffy dumplings since doing so may cause the dumplings to fall apart.

Recipe Variations

In addition to the consistency, this Pioneer Woman Chicken and Dumplings recipe made from scratch are simple to adapt to your tastes by adding a wide variety of other ingredients. Here are a few concepts to consider:

Protein Variations:

  • Choose from Italian sausage, ground beef, or ground turkey: The meat should be browned with the onions, carrots, and celery, then crumbled while it is cooking.
  • Sausage: Once the kielbasa, Polish sausage, or chicken sausage has reached the desired doneness, transfer it to a platter. After slicing or chopping the meat into bite-sized pieces, return it to the soup along with the liquid, and let it boil with the veggies.
  • Bacon: Once it has reached the desired crispiness, remove the thick-cut bacon from the saucepan. Make sure to set aside some of the drippings to use for cooking the chicken. At the very end of the cooking process, crumble the bacon and add it to the soup.
  • Ham: Just before putting in the dumplings, add the ham. Because ham tends to have a salty flavor, the recipe should call for less salt overall, and additional seasoning can be added to taste.

Vegetable Variations:

It is best to stay with carrots and celery, but you are free to add any additional veggies you choose, including the following:

  • Corn: You may use canned sweet corn that has been drained, or you can use frozen sweet corn without having to defrost it first.
  • Mushrooms: The most flavor will be extracted from cremini or baby Bella mushrooms.
  • Bell peppers: Any hue will have a delicious flavor. They should be added just before the dumplings.
  • Sweet or Yukon gold potatoes: Peel the apple, then cut it into pieces about half an inch long and add it to the broth.
  • Squash with butternut flavor: Peel the apple, then cut it into pieces about half an inch long and add it to the broth.
  • Broccoli: Toss in shortly before the dumplings after being chopped into bite-sized pieces.
  • Cauliflower: Toss in shortly before the dumplings after being chopped into bite-sized pieces.
  • Zucchini: Prepare the zucchini by slicing it into quarters and then adding it shortly before the dumplings. To prevent the zucchini from becoming too mushy, cut it into thick slices of approximately a quarter of an inch.
  • Green beans: The flavor of fresh green beans is significantly superior to that of canned green beans. Cut into pieces that are approximately 2 inches long and put just before the dumplings.
Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 
Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 

What Chicken For The Best Chicken And Dumplings?

For the very finest rendition of chicken and dumplings, boneless or bone-in chicken thighs come highly recommended by yours truly. When I first started making soap, I didn’t always use chicken thighs in the recipes, but once I did, there was no turning back. Because chicken thighs are made of dark flesh, they have a naturally more succulent and flavorful texture than chicken breasts, and they also yield poultry that is far more tender. They are also more difficult to overcook, remain soft for days, and have a texture that is more appealing to the tongue, even after being warmed for use as leftovers.

In addition, the chicken thighs are browned before the rest of the ingredients, which provides an essential additional layer of flavor to the soup as a whole. All of those golden, tasty pieces end up being incorporated into the broth.

Do I Have To Add Egg To Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings?

No! However, even though I adore the incorporation of the egg for the reasons described above, doing so is not required. If you choose not to use eggs in the recipe, increase the amount of buttermilk to one cup and the amount of butter to eight tablespoons.

What Kinds Of Dumplings Are Used For Chicken And Dumplings?

In this recipe for Chicken and Dumplings, you have the option of using one of three different kinds of dumplings: drop dumplings, biscuit dumplings, or rolled dumplings/noodle dumplings. Drop dumplings are my personal favorite. In this recipe, I’ve decided to use drop dumplings since they’re the ones that I’ve found to be the airiest and fluffiest, but in the end, it just comes down to whatever one you like. You’ll find instructions for making each variety of dumplings below the “Tips and Tricks” section, giving you the freedom to pick your culinary path!

What To Serve With Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings?

To round off the meal, complement the Chicken and Dumplings from The Pioneer Woman with one of the simple dishes described in the following paragraphs:

How To Make Diy Buttermilk?

You shouldn’t worry if you don’t have any on hand because I rarely do! For this recipe, you may manufacture your buttermilk or sour milk by adding one tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice to a measuring glass. This will give you sour milk. Add enough whole milk (not nonfat) to make up the remaining 3/4 cup. Give it a swirl, then let it aside for five to ten minutes so that it may activate and become somewhat curdled.

Can I Use Fresh Herbs?

In this homemade pioneer lady dish, I find that dried herbs work best. Chicken and Dumplings because the dumplings are one of the first ingredients added to the soup, so their taste is absorbed into the broth. It is recommended that fresh herbs be added towards the end of the cooking process; however, this might be challenging because the dumplings are piled on top.

How Long Does Leftover Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings Last In The Fridge?

If you first seal your Pioneer woman chicken and dumplings in an airtight container and then place the container itself inside the refrigerator, you should be able to keep the chicken and dumplings inside the refrigerator for up to five days.

Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 
Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 

Can You Freeze Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings?

Creamy soups, as a general rule of thumb, do not freeze well because their consistency can become unpleasantly gritty when the dairy and fat separate out during the freezing process. Even if you follow these instructions, you may still freeze the soup; however, while doing so, leave out the half and half. You also have the option of using evaporated milk for the half-and-half in this recipe.

  • Cook: Prepare the Chicken and Dumplings recipe by the guidelines provided in the recipe.
  • Allow the soup to cool fully before placing it in the freezer: This will ensure that the integrity of the components is maintained and that the soup does not enter the “danger zone.”
  • Package: Transfer the soup to a container that can be placed in the freezer and is airtight, making sure that the dumplings are positioned on top.
  • Freeze: Put in the freezer for up to three months.
  • Defrost/Reheat: When you are ready to use it, thaw it in the refrigerator overnight, and then reheat it in the microwave or on the stove according to the directions that were given before.

How To Reheat Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings?

In The Stove:

Warm the soup over medium-low heat, and while doing so, toss the dumplings about in it frequently. Continue doing this until the dumplings are thoroughly warmed through.

In The Microwave:

After transferring individual servings to a plate that is safe for the microwave, microwave them for two minutes. After removing from the microwave, mix the dumplings around, and then microwave them for further 30-second intervals, if necessary.

FAQ Section

What Can I Prepare Ahead Of Time?

Although this recipe for homemade chicken and dumplings is relatively straightforward, it does involve some preparation work, such as cutting the chicken and slicing the veggies. You may cut down on wasted time by:
Chicken may be stored in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours when it is first prepared by removing any excess fat from the chicken thighs and placing them in a freezer bag or airtight container.
Prepare the vegetables by dicing them: You may dice the vegetables and aromatics a few days in advance, the night before supper, or just a few hours before cooking, and then keep the diced vegetables and aromatics in separate airtight containers in the refrigerator.
The process of measuring out the spices doesn’t take very long, but you can get ahead of yourself by doing it now and storing the resulting blend in a jar or bag that is airtight.

Can I Make The Soup Gluten Free?

Yes! Use a gluten-free baking flour such as Bob’s Red Mill if you wish to prepare chicken and dumplings from scratch while adhering to a gluten-free diet. 1: 1 baking flour; the remaining components can safely be consumed by gluten-free individuals.

Can I Use Vegetable Broth Instead?

I do not advocate using vegetarian broth since it does not have the flavor of chicken, which is essential for the success of this straightforward recipe for chicken and dumplings. Even though this does not mean that you cannot use vegetarian broth, it does mean that the soup will not have a delicious and robust taste.

Try More Recipes:

Pioneer Woman Taco Soup Recipe
Pioneer Woman Green Bean Casserole
Pioneer Woman Pumpkin Bread

Chicken And Dumplings Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Serving

  • Calories 339
  • Total Fat 18g
  • Saturated Fat 7.7g
  • Cholesterol 102mg
  • Sodium 817mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 21g
  • Dietary Fiber 2g
  • Sugars 3.2g
  • Protein 23g
  • Vitamin A 77%
  • Vitamin C 7%
  • Calcium 12%
  • Iron 13%

Nutrition Facts Source: Source

Image Source:: Source

Pioneer Woman Chicken And Dumplings 

Difficulty:BeginnerPrep time: 20 minutesCook time: 45 minutesRest time: minutesTotal time: 1 minuteServings:4 servingsCalories:339 kcal Best Season:Summer

Description

This recipe for Chicken and Dumplings from The Pioneer Woman is a meal-in-one that does not include any condensed soup and will be loved by the whole family. Because of my special ingredient, the dumplings are light and airy, with a biscuit-like texture, and while they are deliciously soft and not sticky, they manage to keep their shape and don’t fall apart when they are cooked.

Ingredients

    Soup

  • Dumplings:

Instructions

  1. In a measuring glass or a small dish, whisk together the buttermilk and the egg. Then, place the mixture in the refrigerator until it is time to make the dumplings.
  2. In a large Dutch oven or soup pot, bring 2 tablespoons of oil up to temperature over medium-high heat. The chicken should be seasoned with half a teaspoon of salt and half a teaspoon of pepper before being seared for about two minutes on each side. Transfer to a platter, but do not discard the drippings.
  3. Over medium heat, melt three tablespoons of butter together with two tablespoons of olive oil. After adding the onions, carrots, and celery, continue to sauté the mixture for another four minutes while scraping off the gold pieces that have accumulated on the bottom of the pan. 
  4. It will get thick; make sure the flour doesn’t cling to the bottom of the pot or it will burn later on. Add the garlic and sauté it for thirty seconds. Sprinkle in the flour and continue cooking while stirring regularly for two minutes. You can add extra oil if needed.
  5. Mix in the chicken broth, chicken bouillon, all of the spices, a quarter of a teaspoon of salt, and the bay leaf, then add the chicken broth. 
  6. Put the chicken back into the cooking pot. After the soup has reached a simmer, replace the lid on the pot and move it to the side so that it just partially covers the pot, leaving an opening of approximately an inch. Simmer the soup for 12 to 15 minutes, stirring it regularly and replacing the lid. When the chicken is cooked through and soft enough to shred, the soup is done. Prepare the dough for the dumplings in the meantime.
  7. Dumplings: Mix all of the dry ingredients in a large bowl using a whisk. Stir melted butter into the buttermilk/egg mixture until tiny clumps form.
  8. DON’T overmix the batter mixture; instead, gently fold the curdled buttermilk mixture into the flour mixture using a rubber spatula just until incorporated and the batter mixture begins to slightly pull away from the edges of the bowl. Set the batter mixture aside.
  9. When the chicken is ready, transfer it to a chopping board, and then shred it before returning it to the saucepan. Cornstarch and half-and-half should be mixed until smooth before being added back into the kettle. To prepare the soup, bring it to a low simmer.
  10. Dollop pieces of dough into the boiling soup using a greased tablespoon or a cookie scoop numbered 50, making sure to leave some room between each piece. 
  11. Cover, and then lower the heat to a low setting. Cook for fifteen to twenty minutes, or until the dumplings have reached the desired doneness. You may test a dumpling by slicing it in half and looking inside. 
  12. Before serving, give the soup ten minutes to rest; this will give the dumplings time to soak up some of the liquid from the soup. Add more salt and pepper to each bowl, according to personal preference.

Notes

  • Tips For Dumplings:
  • Diy buttermilk/sour milk: To make your buttermilk or sour milk, take a measuring glass and add one tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice to it. Add enough whole milk (not nonfat) to make up the remainder of the 3/4 cup. To activate it, stir it and then let it sit for 5–10 minutes.
  • Cornmeal can be used: Cornmeal not only imparts a deliciously nutty maize taste to the dumplings but also improves the texture of the dumplings and keeps them from becoming sticky.
  • It’s great to have clumps: The secret to making delicate biscuits is in combining the buttermilk, egg, and melted butter. Small clumps of solidified butter occur as the heated, melted butter is mixed with the cold buttermilk and egg, giving the appearance that the butter has been curdled. Without having to chop the butter into the flour first, the curdled butter particles are what aerate the dough and produce the perfect texture for the finished product.
  • Be careful not to overmix: After the wet components have been added to the dry ones, the dough has to be stirred very slowly and carefully until it comes together. You want your dough to be on the loose side and to have a good amount of air in it. When the dough is overmixed, the gluten in the wheat forms elastic strands of gluten, which leads to a texture that is thick, chewy, and rough. As soon as you can see that the dough is coming together and pulling away from the bowl, you should stop mixing it.
  • Avoid putting dumplings in the bag: To shape the dough into dumplings, you may either use a cookie dough scoop or a spoon. Avoid shaping the dough with your hands after it has been scooped, as this will cause the dough to get compacted and result in dumplings that are rough and chewy.
  • Take cover, and try not to peek: After you have added the dumplings, be sure to cover the pot so that the dumplings may cook evenly while being steamed, resulting in dumplings that are perfectly light and delicate. Fight the temptation to lift the lid until it is time to check whether the food is done. If you open the cover, all of the lovely steam will leave, and the dumplings will begin to boil rather than steam when the kettle begins to generate steam once more. If you do not have a lid for your pot, cover it with aluminum foil in the most secure manner possible.
  • Have fun: Dumplings and chicken and dumplings are a marriage made in culinary heaven, but dumplings are so versatile that they may be added to any kind of soup. You may add dumplings to MinestroneCorn Chowder, your leftover Thanksgiving turkey soup, and other types of soup. These exquisite dumplings are a safe bet; you just can’t go wrong with them.
  • Tips For Soup:
  • Use chicken thighs in your Pioneer Woman recipe: This straightforward recipe for Chicken and Dumplings may be made with either chicken breasts or chicken thighs; however, using chicken thighs or shredded rotisserie chicken yields the greatest flavor and the juiciest chicken.
  • Rotisserie chicken: When you would normally add the shredded chicken thighs to the soup, instead add around three cups’ worth of shredded chicken. To ensure that I always have chicken on hand to add to any soup recipe, I like to keep shredded chicken or chicken from a rotisserie chicken portioned into freezer bags holding three cups each.
  • Customize veggies: You may use whatever vegetables you have on hand, in addition to the mirepoix, or you can mix them up for some added fun! Everything from green beans and maize to potatoes and zucchini would taste wonderful. Be aware, however, that the majority of the veggies will not require the complete cooking time; for more specific directions, please refer to the Variations section.
  • Vegetable size: Because they are going to simmer for a longer period than most soups, the carrots and celery should have a thickness of at least half an inch. If you want to keep your vegetables from turning into mush, avoid cutting them too finely.
  • A replacement for half and a half: If you don’t have any half-and-half on hand, you may substitute milk and heavy cream in equal parts, or you can use evaporated milk instead.
  • Flour should not be burned: If you allow the flour to become stuck to the bottom of the saucepan, it will burn when you try to use it later. If the flour is difficult to work with, you may always add more oil.
  • Consistency: You have the option of making this Chicken and Dumplings dish thicker and more like gravy, or you can make it more like a broth. Check out the area where I explain how to change the consistency.
  • At the latter end of the cooking time, do not stir: Do not stir the mixture once the pot is completely covered with magnificent, fluffy dumplings since doing so may cause the dumplings to fall apart.
  • Recipe Variations
  • In addition to the consistency, this Pioneer Woman Chicken and Dumplings recipe made from scratch are simple to adapt to your tastes by adding a wide variety of other ingredients. Here are a few concepts to consider:
  • Protein Variations:
  • Choose from Italian sausage, ground beef, or ground turkey: The meat should be browned with the onions, carrots, and celery, then crumbled while it is cooking.
  • Sausage: Once the kielbasa, Polish sausage, or chicken sausage has reached the desired doneness, transfer it to a platter. After slicing or chopping the meat into bite-sized pieces, return it to the soup along with the liquid, and let it boil with the veggies.
  • Bacon: Once it has reached the desired crispiness, remove the thick-cut bacon from the saucepan. Make sure to set aside some of the drippings to use for cooking the chicken. At the very end of the cooking process, crumble the bacon and add it to the soup.
  • Ham: Just before putting in the dumplings, add the ham. Because ham tends to have a salty flavor, the recipe should call for less salt overall, and additional seasoning can be added to taste.
  • Vegetable Variations:
  • It is best to stay with carrots and celery, but you are free to add any additional veggies you choose, including the following:
  • Corn: You may use canned sweet corn that has been drained, or you can use frozen sweet corn without having to defrost it first.
  • Mushrooms: The most flavor will be extracted from cremini or baby Bella mushrooms.
  • Bell peppers: Any hue will have a delicious flavor. They should be added just before the dumplings.
  • Sweet or Yukon gold potatoes: Peel the apple, then cut it into pieces about half an inch long and add it to the broth.
  • Squash with butternut flavor: Peel the apple, then cut it into pieces about half an inch long and add it to the broth.
  • Broccoli: Toss in shortly before the dumplings after being chopped into bite-sized pieces.
  • Cauliflower: Toss in shortly before the dumplings after being chopped into bite-sized pieces.
  • Zucchini: Prepare the zucchini by slicing it into quarters and then adding it shortly before the dumplings. To prevent the zucchini from becoming too mushy, cut it into thick slices of approximately a quarter of an inch.
  • Green beans: The flavor of fresh green beans is significantly superior to that of canned green beans. Cut into pieces that are approximately 2 inches long and put just before the dumplings.
Nutrition Facts

Servings 4


Amount Per Serving
Calories 339
Calories from Fat 160
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 18g28%
Saturated Fat 7.7g39%
Trans Fat 0.3g
Cholesterol 102mg34%
Sodium 817mg35%
Potassium 424mg13%
Total Carbohydrate 21g8%
Dietary Fiber 2g8%
Sugars 3.2g
Protein 23g46%

Vitamin A 77%
Vitamin C 7%
Calcium 12%
Iron 13%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily value may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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